What were the historical reasons for the resistance to recognizing airborne transmission during the COVID-19 pandemic?

The study titled “What were the historical reasons for the resistance to recognizing airborne transmission during the COVID-19 pandemic?” provides a comprehensive historical analysis of the debate surrounding the modes of transmission of respiratory diseases, including COVID-19. Here’s a detailed summary: In summary, this study highlights the historical reasons behind the resistance to recognizing airborne transmission during the COVID-19 pandemic. It critically examines the evolution of disease transmission theories and the impact of these beliefs on the response to the pandemic, emphasizing the need for a more nuanced understanding of transmission routes for effective public health strategies. Read More: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3904176

Risk of Death in Patients Hospitalized for COVID-19 vs Seasonal Influenza in Fall-Winter 2022-2023

The study “Risk of Death in Patients Hospitalized for COVID-19 vs Seasonal Influenza in Fall-Winter 2022-2023” compares the mortality risk between COVID-19 and seasonal influenza hospitalizations. This detailed summary: In summary, this study provides updated insights into the relative risks of death from COVID-19 and seasonal influenza hospitalizations during the fall-winter of 2022-2023. It highlights the continuing higher risk associated with COVID-19, albeit reduced from early pandemic levels, and underscores the importance of vaccination in reducing COVID-19 mortality. Read More: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2803749

COVID-19 and influenza infections mediate distinct pulmonary cellular and transcriptomic changes

The study “COVID-19 and influenza infections mediate distinct pulmonary cellular and transcriptomic changes” examines the differences in lung tissue response between SARS-CoV-2 and influenza (H1N1) infections in K18-human ACE2 transgenic mice. Key findings include: SARS-CoV-2 Infection Leads to Persistent Lung Abnormalities: Sub-lethally infected K18-human ACE2 mice showed patchy pneumonia, histiocytic inflammation, and collagen deposition at 21 and 45 days post-infection (DPI). In contrast to influenza, SARS-CoV-2-infected mice had reduced interferon-gamma/alpha responses and failed to induce keratin 5 (Krt5), a marker of nascent pulmonary progenitor cells. This suggests SARS-CoV-2 infection does not induce the proliferation of nascent Krt5+ cells in consolidated…